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  The Mother of Henry at The Los Angeles Theatre Center

The Mother of Henry

The Los Angeles Theatre Center
514 S. Spring St. Los Angeles

In 1968, a year of watershed moments in the United States — the assassinations of Dr. Martin Luther King and Bobby Kennedy, lunar space exploration and the Vietnam War — Connie, a single mother of five, gets a job at Sears in Boyle Heights. When Connie’s son gets drafted and is sent to Vietnam, her mother makes her pray to La Virgen de Guadalupe for his protection. As Connie tries to remember how to pray, La Virgen appears to her and their friendship grows as she navigates work, love, war and her new independence. This Latino Theater Company production of Evelina Fernandez's The Mother of Henry comes to the Los Angeles Theatre Center. This show is in English but does contain some Spanish.

Thru - Apr 14, 2019

Thursdays: 8:00pm
Fridays: 8:00pm
Saturdays: 8:00pm
Sundays: 4:00pm



Price: $20-$50

Show Type: Drama

Box Office: 866-811-4111

www.thelatc.org



  The Mother of Henry Reviews
  • Highly Recommended
  • Recommended
  • Somewhat Recommended
  • Not Recommended

Los Angeles Times - Recommended

"...The story, if summarized, might sound more bitter than sweet, but the strength of the performances, the warmth and humor of the developing relationships, the excellence of the design elements and Valenzuela's spirited direction cast an irresistible spell. What it means to be American seems likely to keep changing, just as radically now as it did, but maybe we can get through it if we stick together."
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Margaret Gray


ArtsBeatLA - Highly Recommended

"...Director Jose Luis Valenzuela stages the play well, making good use of the dual level set (scenic and lighting design is by Emily McDonald and Cameron Mock, respectively). Yee Eun Nam created the projections that provide plenty of newsworthy context as well as vivid floral animation to enhance Connie's encounters with La Virgen."
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Pauline Adamek


Stage Raw - Highly Recommended

"...Director José Luis Valenzuela’s clear direction extracts the full impact of the piece. Movement choreographer Urbanie Lucero helps create organized and artistically compelling transitions. Yee Eun Nam’s videography is the evening’s highlight, and elevates the quality of the entire experience. Her work feels both both epic and intimate, artful and deliberate. The use of imagery, text and audio from such a historically tragic and remarkable year is extremely effective. Complimentary lighting design by Cameron Mock."
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Dana Martin


Theatre Notes - Highly Recommended

"...The cast, under the inspired direction of Mr. Valenzuela, is splendid. The guitar playing and songs sung by Mr. Revell and Ms. America are like being at the Fillmore or Winterland back in the day."
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Paul Myrvold


Peoples World - Highly Recommended

"...The ever fertile Latino Theater Company is at it again with another powerful play about East L.A.'s largely Latinx working class. It's set in the melting pot of Boyle Heights in the 1960s. The Mother of Henry is by LTC resident playwright Evelina Fernandez and helmed by the company's artistic director Jose Luis Valenzuela."
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Eric Gordon


Capital And Main - Recommended

"...As with the ensemble, the staging features fine work from everyone, a mark of Valenzuela's assured direction. Scenic and lighting designers Emily Anne MacDonald and Cameron Jaye Mock keep the office set simple, in effective contrast to the more elaborate magical realism enveloping La Virgen. Video designer Yee Eun Nam floods the backdrop with historic images that give us a genuine sense of the era these people are living through. And designer John Zalewski's sound adds layers of ambiance. A Hendrix-styled guitar solo from the Angel segues to a single excruciatingly dissonant note - a reflection, perhaps, of our anger and anguish when our world goes tragically awry."
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Deborah Klugman



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